Sesame Honey Chicken (from 12 Tomatoes website)

January 20, 2015

Sesame Honey Chicken

Like Chinese Food but not the MSG and any other additives?

This recipe starts out very healthy, but feel free to make it your own.

Sesame Honey Chicken

Serves 6

Ingredients

Chicken:

  • 1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into small cubes
  • 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/4 cups buttermilk
  • 2/3 cup peanut or vegetable oil, for frying
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Sauce:

  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 3 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Directions

  1. For the sauce: in a small bowl or glass, combine water and cornstarch to make a slurry and stir until dissolved. Set slurry aside.
  2. Place honey, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar, sesame oil and red pepper flakes in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, and bring to a boil.
  3. Slowly stir in cornstarch slurry and reduce heat to a simmer. Mix until cornstarch has cooked out and sauce has thickened, 5-10 minutes, and set aside.
  4. In a large, shallow dish, mix together flour, cumin, chili powder, salt and powder.
  5. Heat oil in a large skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat.
  6. Set up a bowl with the buttermilk and place next to your workstation.
  7. Piece by piece, dredge chicken cubes in flour, coat fully in buttermilk, drip off excess, and dredge again in flour and spice mixture, pressing firmly to adhere.
  8. When oil is hot enough (when splashing some water into it causes it to sizzle, but it’s not smoking or burning) add chicken cubes and cook for 4-5 minutes, flipping in the middle, or until chicken is an even golden brown and crispy.
  9. Use a slotted spoon to transfer chicken to a paper towel-lined plate.
  10. Move all chicken pieces to a large bowl and pour honey sauce over the top. Toss to coat thoroughly and add sesame seeds.
  11. Toss again and serve immediately over rice or noodles

Go Red for Women – Wear Red Day, Friday February 6th

January 15, 2015

http://www.goredforwomen.org/wearredday/

 

 

 

 

More from the National Institute of Health

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hdw

How Does Heart Disease Affect Women?

In the United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. In fact, coronary heart disease (CHD)—the most common type of heart disease—is the #1 killer of both men and women in the United States.

Other types of heart disease, such as coronary microvascular disease (MVD) and broken heart syndrome, also pose a risk for women. These disorders, which mainly affect women, are not as well understood as CHD. However, research is ongoing to learn more about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome.

This article focuses on CHD and its complications. However, it also includes general information about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome.

Coronary Heart Disease

CHD is a disease in which plaque (plak) builds up on the inner walls of your coronary arteries. These arteries carry oxygen-rich blood to your heart. When plaque builds up in the arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis (ath-er-o-skler-O-sis).

Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque can harden or rupture (break open).

Hardened plaque narrows the coronary arteries and reduces the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the heart. This can cause chest pain or discomfort called angina (an-JI-nuh or AN-juh-nuh).

If the plaque ruptures, a blood clot can form on its surface. A large blood clot can mostly or completely block blood flow through a coronary artery. This is the most common cause of a heart attack. Over time, ruptured plaque also hardens and narrows the coronary arteries.

Heart With Muscle Damage and a Blocked Artery

The picture shows the standard setup for an EKG. In figure A, a heart rhythm recording shows the electrical pattern of a normal heartbeat. In figure B, a patient lies in a bed with EKG electrodes attached to his chest, upper arms, and legs. A nurse oversees the painless procedure.

Figure A is an overview of a heart and coronary artery showing damage (dead heart muscle) caused by a heart attack. Figure B is a cross-section of the coronary artery with plaque buildup and a blood clot resulting from plaque rupture.

Plaque also can develop within the walls of the coronary arteries. Tests that show the insides of the coronary arteries may look normal in people who have this pattern of plaque. Studies are under way to see whether this type of plaque buildup occurs more often in women than in men and why.

In addition to angina and heart attack, CHD can cause other serious heart problems. The disease may lead to heart failure, irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias (ah-RITH-me-ahs), and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

Coronary Microvascular Disease

Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart’s tiny arteries. This disease is also called cardiac syndrome X or nonobstructive CHD. In coronary MVD, the walls of the heart’s tiny arteries are damaged or diseased.

Coronary Microvascular Disease

The illustration shows the standard setup for an EKG. In figure A, a normal heart rhythm recording shows the electrical pattern of a regular heartbeat. In figure B, a patient lies in a bed with EKG electrodes attached to his chest, upper arms, and legs. A nurse monitors the painless procedure.

Figure A shows the small coronary artery network (microvasculature), containing a normal artery and an artery with coronary MVD. Figure B shows a large coronary artery with plaque buildup.

Women are more likely than men to have coronary MVD. Many researchers think that a drop in estrogen levels during menopause combined with other heart disease risk factors causes coronary MVD.

Although death rates from heart disease have dropped in the last 30 years, they haven’t dropped as much in women as in men. This may be the result of coronary MVD.

Standard tests for CHD are not designed to detect coronary MVD. Thus, test results for women who have coronary MVD may show that they are at low risk for heart disease.

Research is ongoing to learn more about coronary MVD and its causes.

Broken Heart Syndrome

Women are also more likely than men to have a condition called broken heart syndrome. In this recently recognized heart problem, extreme emotional stress can lead to severe (but often short-term) heart muscle failure.

Broken heart syndrome is also called stress-induced cardiomyopathy (KAR-de-o-mi-OP-ah-thee) or takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

Doctors may misdiagnose broken heart syndrome as a heart attack because it has similar symptoms and test results. However, there’s no evidence of blocked heart arteries in broken heart syndrome, and most people have a full and quick recovery.

Researchers are just starting to explore what causes this disorder and how to diagnose and treat it. Often, patients who have broken heart syndrome have previously been healthy.

Outlook

Women tend to have CHD about 10 years later than men. However, CHD remains the #1 killer of women in the United States.

The good news is that you can control many CHD risk factors. CHD risk factors are conditions or habits that raise your risk for CHD and heart attack. These risk factors also can increase the chance that existing CHD will worsen.

Lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical or surgical procedures can help women lower their risk for CHD. Thus, early and ongoing CHD prevention is important.

More information about heart disease in women is available through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s The Heart Truth® campaign.

____________

®The Heart Truth is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

The Other “Hard Talk”

January 9, 2015

family

Excerpted from the article:

When Should You Get Power of Attorney For a Parent?

Multiple types of agreements cover healthcare, finances and more

By Eileen Beal | Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging

 Click thru below for the full article on www.nextavenue.org

http://www.nextavenue.org/article/2015-01/when-should-you-get-power-attorney-parent?utm_source=na_socialmedia&utm_medium=na_socialmedia&utm_campaign=na_socialmedia

 

The following are important documents to establish and have readily on hand before your loved one needs your help with financial, legal, health decisions and more.  Its a very hard conversation to have, but its very essential for all concerned.  Have the talk, seek out legal advice, file away in a safe place…you’ll be glad you did.

1. Power of Attorney for Health Care, which grants you (as the designated agent) the right to make all health care decisions for your parent when he or she is unable to do so. This document should be shared with your parent’s primary care physician and, if he or she is admitted to a hospital, included in his or her hospital records.

2. Limited Power of Attorney, which grants you limited powers and/or time to act in a specific situation. For example, a Limited POA might enable you to sell your father’s lifelong collection of baseball cards or manage your mother’s move from her current home to an assisted living community. The Limited POA expires when the task is completed or the timeframe ends, whichever comes first.

3. Financial Power of Attorney, which grants you access to and management of financial accounts and resources specifically listed in the POA. Some Financial POAs divvy up responsibilities, giving one individual access to accounts used for bill paying and another person management of stock and investment accounts.

4. Durable Power of Attorney, which grants you the right to manage all aspects of your parent’s life and finances, and health care, where specified. It goes into effect when signed and stays in effect until your parent cancels it or dies.

5. Springing Power of Attorney, which “springs” into action in case of an emergency in which your parent becomes incapacitated and unable to speak for himself or herself. When (or if) the crisis is over and he or she is able to speak for himself or herself, the POA ceases to be in effect.

Stay On Top Of The Documents

If you go the POA route, Rahl suggests making copies of all the documents involved and storing them in a safe, easily accessible place. These documents might include:

1. Title/ownership documents (deeds, stock certificates, loan papers, car title, etc.)

2. Contracts and other legally binding agreements

3. Legal documents (birth/adoption certificates, marriage certificates, wills, other/situational powers of attorney)

4. Bank records that show ownership and how accounts are held (statements, passbooks, CDs, safety deposit box information, etc.)

5. List of major assets (real estate, financial accounts, stocks, cash, jewelry, insurance, pre-paid funeral arrangements, etc.)

6. List of outstanding debts (with supporting materials if available)

7. Living will/advanced directives

8. Names and numbers of doctors, attorneys, accountants, etc.

Services Provided

* Primary Residence Cleaning
* Companionship & Errand Services
* Transport to Appointments
* Hospital Discharge Assessment
* Minor Residential Repairs
* Grocery Shopping
* Planning & Preparing Meals
* Personal Care Assistance
* Weekly Linens & Laundry Services
* Alzheimer's/Dementia Care
* Medication Reminders
* Aging & Health Resources

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