Go Red for Women – Wear Red Day, Friday February 6th

January 15, 2015

http://www.goredforwomen.org/wearredday/

 

 

 

 

More from the National Institute of Health

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hdw

How Does Heart Disease Affect Women?

In the United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. In fact, coronary heart disease (CHD)—the most common type of heart disease—is the #1 killer of both men and women in the United States.

Other types of heart disease, such as coronary microvascular disease (MVD) and broken heart syndrome, also pose a risk for women. These disorders, which mainly affect women, are not as well understood as CHD. However, research is ongoing to learn more about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome.

This article focuses on CHD and its complications. However, it also includes general information about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome.

Coronary Heart Disease

CHD is a disease in which plaque (plak) builds up on the inner walls of your coronary arteries. These arteries carry oxygen-rich blood to your heart. When plaque builds up in the arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis (ath-er-o-skler-O-sis).

Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque can harden or rupture (break open).

Hardened plaque narrows the coronary arteries and reduces the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the heart. This can cause chest pain or discomfort called angina (an-JI-nuh or AN-juh-nuh).

If the plaque ruptures, a blood clot can form on its surface. A large blood clot can mostly or completely block blood flow through a coronary artery. This is the most common cause of a heart attack. Over time, ruptured plaque also hardens and narrows the coronary arteries.

Heart With Muscle Damage and a Blocked Artery

The picture shows the standard setup for an EKG. In figure A, a heart rhythm recording shows the electrical pattern of a normal heartbeat. In figure B, a patient lies in a bed with EKG electrodes attached to his chest, upper arms, and legs. A nurse oversees the painless procedure.

Figure A is an overview of a heart and coronary artery showing damage (dead heart muscle) caused by a heart attack. Figure B is a cross-section of the coronary artery with plaque buildup and a blood clot resulting from plaque rupture.

Plaque also can develop within the walls of the coronary arteries. Tests that show the insides of the coronary arteries may look normal in people who have this pattern of plaque. Studies are under way to see whether this type of plaque buildup occurs more often in women than in men and why.

In addition to angina and heart attack, CHD can cause other serious heart problems. The disease may lead to heart failure, irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias (ah-RITH-me-ahs), and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

Coronary Microvascular Disease

Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart’s tiny arteries. This disease is also called cardiac syndrome X or nonobstructive CHD. In coronary MVD, the walls of the heart’s tiny arteries are damaged or diseased.

Coronary Microvascular Disease

The illustration shows the standard setup for an EKG. In figure A, a normal heart rhythm recording shows the electrical pattern of a regular heartbeat. In figure B, a patient lies in a bed with EKG electrodes attached to his chest, upper arms, and legs. A nurse monitors the painless procedure.

Figure A shows the small coronary artery network (microvasculature), containing a normal artery and an artery with coronary MVD. Figure B shows a large coronary artery with plaque buildup.

Women are more likely than men to have coronary MVD. Many researchers think that a drop in estrogen levels during menopause combined with other heart disease risk factors causes coronary MVD.

Although death rates from heart disease have dropped in the last 30 years, they haven’t dropped as much in women as in men. This may be the result of coronary MVD.

Standard tests for CHD are not designed to detect coronary MVD. Thus, test results for women who have coronary MVD may show that they are at low risk for heart disease.

Research is ongoing to learn more about coronary MVD and its causes.

Broken Heart Syndrome

Women are also more likely than men to have a condition called broken heart syndrome. In this recently recognized heart problem, extreme emotional stress can lead to severe (but often short-term) heart muscle failure.

Broken heart syndrome is also called stress-induced cardiomyopathy (KAR-de-o-mi-OP-ah-thee) or takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

Doctors may misdiagnose broken heart syndrome as a heart attack because it has similar symptoms and test results. However, there’s no evidence of blocked heart arteries in broken heart syndrome, and most people have a full and quick recovery.

Researchers are just starting to explore what causes this disorder and how to diagnose and treat it. Often, patients who have broken heart syndrome have previously been healthy.

Outlook

Women tend to have CHD about 10 years later than men. However, CHD remains the #1 killer of women in the United States.

The good news is that you can control many CHD risk factors. CHD risk factors are conditions or habits that raise your risk for CHD and heart attack. These risk factors also can increase the chance that existing CHD will worsen.

Lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical or surgical procedures can help women lower their risk for CHD. Thus, early and ongoing CHD prevention is important.

More information about heart disease in women is available through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s The Heart Truth® campaign.

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®The Heart Truth is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

“Aging isn’t an illness, but a way of Life”

April 24, 2014

“Time flies they say, but its us that fly.  Time sits on its hands as we rush by.”

Click below for a short, inspiring video from AgeUK

http://youtu.be/-EXdLhEyUHw

 

From the American Heart Association – Go Red for Women

January 21, 2014

https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/heart-disease-news/the-lego-movie-raises-heart-disease-awareness/

PA Home Care of Lancaster, Proud to Support

American Heart Association – Go Red for Women

Click Link Below to View

http://youtu.be/xkqJUUcu_ls

American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women and Ad Council Launch National Public Service Advertising Campaign to Address the No. 1 Killer of Women in the U.S.: Heart Disease

New Go Red for Women PSAs, Created in Partnership with Warner Bros., Feature Character and Scenes fromThe LEGO® Movie to Increase Awareness of Heart Disease in Women

One out of every three deaths among women in the U.S. each year is attributed to cardiovascular diseases including heart disease and stroke, making it the No. 1 killer of women in this country and causing more fatalities than all forms of cancer combined, according to the American Heart Association. However, only one in five American women believes that heart disease is her greatest health threat. In an effort to raise awareness of heart disease and empower women with the necessary tools to lead heart healthy lives, the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women and the Ad Council are launching a new public service advertising (PSA) campaign today as an extension of the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement. The launch precedes National Wear Red Day® on Feb. 7, which marks the 10th anniversary of Go Red For Women.

The LEGO Movie and Go Red For Women

Created pro bono by Warner Bros., the new television ads feature scenes and characters from the upcoming The LEGO Movie, encouraging audiences, “It’s time to Go Red For Women.” Voiced by Emmy-nominated actress Elizabeth Banks, the film character Wyldstyle empowers women, asking them to “Stand stronger, shout louder and demand change.” Audiences are directed to GoRedForWomen.org where they can access more information on the disease, including risk factors and symptoms, as well as preventative tips and tools to lead a healthier lifestyle.

In theaters Feb. 7, 2014, The LEGO Movie is the first-ever, full-length theatrical LEGO® adventure.  It starsChris PrattWill FerrellElizabeth BanksWill ArnettNick OffermanAlison Brie and Charlie Day, with Liam Neeson and Morgan Freeman.

“The American Heart Association is grateful for the opportunity to work with both the Ad Council and Warner Brothers on this entertaining and informative public service announcement that will harness the unique magic movies and their characters have to increase women’s awareness about their No. 1 killer – heart disease,” said Dr. Jennifer Mieres, Professor of Cardiology at the Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine and Go Red For Women spokesperson. “While raising funds for women-related education and research is imperative to our success, collaboration with creative partners to create engaging and relevant content also allows the AHA to spark positive behavior change in women and their families.”

Women’s “silent killer”

An estimated 43 million women in the U.S. are affected by cardiovascular disease, resulting in over 400,000 deaths each year, according to the American Heart Association.  The symptoms of cardiovascular disease, such as shortness of breath, nausea, back pain and sweating, can be easy to miss and sometimes not outwardly apparent, causing it to be known as a “silent killer.” However, by knowing the risk factors and taking simple steps like stop smoking, regular physical activity, eating a heart healthy diet and blood pressure monitoring, women can decrease their chances of heart illness.

“Heart disease claims the life of nearly one woman in the United States every minute,” said Peggy Conlon, President and CEO of the Ad Council. “But many women continue to falsely believe the disease is one that just targets men or the elderly and don’t take enough action to reduce their personal risk. Together with longstanding partners the American Heart Association and Warner Brothers, we know we can have an impact on this critical health issue”.

Kathy Spence, Co-Owner and Janis Swartz, RN PA HOME CARE proudly supports GO RED for Women...

Kathy Spence, Co-Owner and Janis Swartz, RN
PA HOME CARE proudly supports GO RED for Women…

Join PA Home Care of Lancaster as we proudly support the American Heart Association in the fight against heart disease and raise awareness  –  GO RED!!!

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